HOW TO REMOVE DEODORANT STAINS

HOW TO REMOVE DEODORANT STAINS

 

The key in learning how to remove deodorant stains is choosing the right products. Start with your laundry detergent and try switching to one that doesn’t contain chlorine bleaches. Also, as tempting as it may seem – especially with white clothing – avoid household or chlorine bleaches as they will only make things worse.

5 TIPS ON REMOVING DEODORANT STAINS

When you need to get rid of armpit stains, the best way to do it is with an acid. Acids actively dissolve the bonds between the proteins, alkali, and aluminium which cause stains.

Finding an acid might sound difficult or expensive, but don’t worry. Many great acidic products can be found around the house, or very cheaply from your local supermarket.

Next time you’re stuck with an inconvenient stain, try one of these five simple acidic stain remedies and see which works best for you:

 

1. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

Soak the stain in equal parts hydrogen peroxide and water. Remember that, hydrogen peroxide has bleaching qualities so this method is only suitable for white clothes.

 

2. BAKING SODA

Mix baking (or bi-carb) soda into a paste in a 3:1 ratio with water and scrub into the stain with an old toothbrush. You can also add a dash of hydrogen peroxide for an extra boost on white clothes. And, if you don’t have baking soda around, pure plain soda water will do the trick, too.

 

3. WHITE VINEGAR

Combine two tablespoons of vinegar with one cup of water and soak clothing.

 

4. LEMON JUICE

Simply combine lemon juice with an equal amount of water and scrub it into the stain.

 

5. SALT

Use salt in the same way as lemon juice, although you might need to scrub the stain with a bit more elbow grease.

 

After you’ve applied the liquid or paste to the stain, let the clothes sit for at least an hour before you wash them in hot water.

Washing clothes before you treat stains can set the proteins and make them much harder to get out.

WARNING: Always be careful when working with any acids, especially when treating delicate and colourful fabrics as acid solutions can damage them.

Citric acid is also slightly hazardous in case of skin contact, eye contact, ingestion or inhalation. For this reason, we highly recommend wearing protective gloves when handling citric acid and to not breathe in citric acid dust.

Always read the label. Follow the directions for use.