Tips for Sun Safety

Beauty tips & healthy skin care hub

USE THESE SUN SAFETY TIPS TO PROTECT AGAINST SUNBURN & SKIN CANCER

It’s important for everyone to spend some time in the sun. It’s also just as important to be familiar with the basic sun safety principles.

Always follow these Sun Safety Tips to minimise your chances of skin damage:

  • Always wear sunscreen with a high SPF – SPF shields your skin from harmful UV rays, protects against sunburn and helps to slow the aging process
  • Cover up- wear sunglasses, protective clothing and a wide-brim hat
  • Stay in the shade near midday when the sun is strongest and reduce time in the sun before and after 3 hours of noon
  • Take precautions to care for your skin after sun exposure

Your bodies need enough vitamin D to help produce calcium for healthy bones. However, regular or excessive exposure to the sun’s UV rays will increase your chances of developing sun spots, moles and even skin cancer. It also accelerates the aging process.

Learn more about our high quality sunscreens and follow our simple sun safety tips to enjoy the sun with confidence.

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YOUR SUN SAFETY QUESTIONS ANSWERED

See the answers to these common questions.

1WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN UVA & UVB?
2WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SPF 30 & SPF 50+?
SPF is all about time, not strength. It stands for Sun Protection Factor – being the length of time your skin is protected from sunburn, depending on your skin type. If you have fair skin and start turning red within 3 minutes, then an SPF 30 sunscreen will protect you for 3 x 30 = 90 minutes. An SPF 50+ sunscreen will give you at least 3 x 50 = 150 minutes protection.
3WHY DO I NEED MOISTURISER IN MY SUNSCREEN?
4WHAT IS THE UV INDEX?
The Ultraviolet index or UV Index is an international standard measurement of the strength of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun at a particular place and time. The purpose of the UV Index is to help people effectively protect themselves from the harmful effects of UV radiation.

UV Index 0 - 2.9: "Low" danger from the sun's UV rays for the average person.
Recommended protection: Wear sunglasses on bright days. Use sunscreen if there is snow on the ground, which reflects UV radiation, or if you have particularly fair skin.

UV Index 3 - 5.9: "Moderate" risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.
Recommended protection: Take precautions, such as covering up, if you will be outside. Stay in shade near midday when the sun is strongest.

UV Index 6 - 7.9: "High" risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.
Recommended protection: Wear sunglasses and use a sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher, cover the body with sun protective clothing and a wide-brim hat, and reduce time in the sun within three hours of noon.

UV Index 8 - 10.9: "Very high" risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.
Recommended protection: Wear SPF 30 sunscreen or SPF 50+ sunscreen, a shirt, sunglasses, and a hat. Do not stay in the sun for too long.

UV Index 11+: "Extreme" risk of harm from unprotected sun exposure.
Recommended protection: Take all precautions. Wear sunglasses and use a SPF 50+ sunscreen. Cover the body with a long-sleeve shirt and trousers, wear a very broad hat, and avoid the sun from three hours before until three hours after noon.